Trans Youth on How Gender-Affirming Care Helps Them Thrive

Trans Youth on How Gender-Affirming Care Helps Them Thrive

Logo’s Trans Youth Town Hall continues to go there.
The second episode of the three-part special, out today (March 30), sees host and executive producer Raquel Willis ask young trans and nonbinary people about their experiences obtaining gender-affirming health care. In light of recent attempts to ban transition-related care for trans kids in various states across the country, their stories are more topical and resonant than ever.
“I’ve had countless experiences with doctors who could not understand that the gender marker on my insurance card didn’t match the girl who was sitting in front of them,” says Sage, a 21-year-old artist and storyteller.
Miles, 22, recounts a similarly frustrating experience about trying to access reproductive health care: “I really needed Plan B, and I called a 1,001 different doctors and was like, ‘Can I take this with testosterone?’ And they were like, ‘You can’t actually get pregnant. You’re a man.’ And I was like, ‘Look. Look. I know what my anatomy is.'”
Although their individual stories run the gamut, these young people all have one thing in common: When they have access to supportive health care, they’re able to thrive.
“Before I transitioned, I didn’t really pick something that I just loved doing,” explains Rebekah, 15. “But after I transitioned, I didn’t have this weight on my shoulders and was able to go out and explore different things like field hockey, like singing, like writing.”
It’s in line with what experts like Chase Strangio, an ACLU attorney and trans activist, have observed personally and professionally. “We know a lot about this care,” he tells Willis. “It’s been around for a long time. It’s supported by every major medical association in the United States. And as parents, something else we know to be true is that pediatrics is full of unknowns. … What state [lawmakers] are doing with these bills is saying that parents can’t make these decisions.”
Part 1 of Trans Youth Town Hall, which tackles sports and safety at school, is available to watch now, and Part 3 airs this Thursday, March 31, at 12pm ET/9am PT, a.k.a. Transgender Day of Visibility. Watch the second episode of Trans Youth Town Hall below, and keep scrolling for more relevant resources.


Trans Lifeline
Grassroots nonprofit offering financial support for trans folks through microgrants and peer crisis support via phone hotlines (in the U.S., call 877-565-8860; in Canada, 877-330-6366)
Transgender Law Center (TLC)
Trans-led organization advocating for the self-determination of all people through policy change
Gender Spectrum
Educational resources for parents, professionals, and queer and trans youth
LGBTQ Family Acceptance
Educational resources for parents and family members of LGBTQ youth
Trans Athletes Speak Out: On the Field, Our Identity “Isn’t an Issue”
Logo’s Trans Youth Town Hall continues to go there.
The second episode of the three-part special, out today (March 30), sees host and executive producer Raquel Willis ask young trans and nonbinary people about their experiences obtaining gender-affirming health care. In light of recent attempts to ban transition-related care for trans kids in various states across the country, their stories are more topical and resonant than ever.
“I’ve had countless experiences with doctors who could not understand that the gender marker on my insurance card didn’t match the girl who was sitting in front of them,” says Sage, a 21-year-old artist and storyteller.
Miles, 22, recounts a similarly frustrating experience about trying to access reproductive health care: “I really needed Plan B, and I called a 1,001 different doctors and was like, ‘Can I take this with testosterone?’ And they were like, ‘You can’t actually get pregnant. You’re a man.’ And I was like, ‘Look. Look. I know what my anatomy is.'”
Although their individual stories run the gamut, these young people all have one thing in common: When they have access to supportive health care, they’re able to thrive.
“Before I transitioned, I didn’t really pick something that I just loved doing,” explains Rebekah, 15. “But after I transitioned, I didn’t have this weight on my shoulders and was able to go out and explore different things like field hockey, like singing, like writing.”
It’s in line with what experts like Chase Strangio, an ACLU attorney and trans activist, have observed personally and professionally. “We know a lot about this care,” he tells Willis. “It’s been around for a long time. It’s supported by every major medical association in the United States. And as parents, something else we know to be true is that pediatrics is full of unknowns. … What state [lawmakers] are doing with these bills is saying that parents can’t make these decisions.”
Part 1 of Trans Youth Town Hall, which tackles sports and safety at school, is available to watch now, and Part 3 airs this Thursday, March 31, at 12pm ET/9am PT, a.k.a. Transgender Day of Visibility. Watch the second episode of Trans Youth Town Hall below, and keep scrolling for more relevant resources.


Trans Lifeline
Grassroots nonprofit offering financial support for trans folks through microgrants and peer crisis support via phone hotlines (in the U.S., call 877-565-8860; in Canada, 877-330-6366)
Transgender Law Center (TLC)
Trans-led organization advocating for the self-determination of all people through policy change
Gender Spectrum
Educational resources for parents, professionals, and queer and trans youth
LGBTQ Family Acceptance
Educational resources for parents and family members of LGBTQ youth
Trans Athletes Speak Out: On the Field, Our Identity “Isn’t an Issue”

Source:http://www.newnownext.com/trans-youth-town-hall-health-care-raquel-willis/03/2022/

Leave your comment
Comment
Name
Email